Friday, May 27, 2022
Life in Space

Astronomers have been trying to find traces of life in space for years, but so far our discovery is limited to planets where some forms of organisms could hypothetically develop. Avi Loeb, a professor at Harvard University, wants to approach the subject in a different way. The Galileo Project he created aims to search for UFO artifacts and technologies that have found their way into the Solar System.

The Galileo project was launched in the summer of 2021 by Avi Loeb, a Harvard professor. One of the goals of Loeb's initiative is the search and study of objects similar to Oumuamua. Project Galileo is limited to the Solar System this is expected to help increase the accuracy of observations. A hundred scientists are already working on the Galileo Project, and within a few weeks of the initiative's launch, Loeb has raised $ 2 billion.

At the outset, it is worth explaining that this is not about Galileo, a European satellite navigation system that is an alternative to the American GPS or Russian GLONASS. The Galileo project has been in development since July 2021, and although the initiative quickly found generous sponsors (Loeb raised nearly $ 2 million, or PLN 8.87 million, from private investors within a few weeks), it is on the sidelines of the scientific world.

Life in Space Galileo searches for Alien technology a

For now, it's hard to say if that's right, as Loeb and the hundred astronomers and researchers around the world involved in the development of the Galileo Project have yet to discover any alien artifact, but the initiative itself is intriguing enough to make it worth a closer look.

Different assumptions, similar goal

Of course, the Galileo Project is not the first initiative to contact or discover an alien civilization - suffice it to mention SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence), a research project launched in the 1960s to intercept radio signals from space. In addition, scientists regularly send "packets of information" into space containing basic data about humanity and the position of the Earth in relation to other objects in our galaxy.

While further development of such initiatives is needed, Leob believes it is necessary to change priorities and begin the search for artifacts of alien civilizations that have ended up in the solar system, either intentionally or by accident. The researcher also adds (in a statement for Science Focus) that this change is already overdue, and in the last decades of increased space observation, humanity has missed many opportunities to discover the remains of UFO technology. As he adds:

Our research so far is based on the assumption that extraterrestrials communicate using radio waves, a technology that we have been using for a little over a century. Advanced extraterrestrials may long ago have abandoned her in favor of other methods of long and short range communication. I think a better strategy is to look for artifacts: alien technologies.

As you can guess, such statements are not very popular in the scientific community. As long as they sound effective and fit well with the media headlines (the vision of discovering UFO artifacts stimulates the imagination), there is simply no evidence to confirm them. In recent years, however, more and more scientists and researchers admit (one of them is Jason Wright, professor at the University of Pennsylvania) that the search for the so-called SETI artifacts have become much more popular.

For Leob himself, controversial from the scientific point of view statements are not unusual. In January 2021, his book "Extraterrestrial" was published, in which he argued that Oumuamua, the first object we detected outside the solar system, is not an asteroid or comet, but a remnant of alien technology. We recently looked at the "space cigar" theories in our journal, and among them we discussed the alien artifact. While Oumuamua has a very unusual shape and does not actually behave like a comet we have discovered before, there is insufficient evidence to conclusively conclude that it is a UFO artifact.

Life in Space Galileo searches for Alien technology b

Currently, Oumuamua is beyond our reach the object is leaving the Solar System (hence it is assigned the characteristics of a single-appearance comet), so we cannot study it. NASA has announced that it wants to catch up with Oumuamua, with the help of Project Lyra, but assuming that the vehicle is to take off from Earth in 2028, the ship will not arrive until around 2050-2054.

While the Oumuamua discovery itself is regarded as a major scientific success, Leob points out that astronomers were not prepared for its appearance, reflecting the low level of knowledge we have about the object. Therefore, one of the assumptions of the described initiative is the willingness to prepare

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Life in Space

Astronomers have been trying to find traces of life in space for years, but so far our discovery is limited to planets where some forms of organisms could hypothetically develop. Avi Loeb, a professor at Harvard University, wants to approach the subject in a different way. The Galileo Project he created aims to search for UFO artifacts and technologies that have found their way into the Solar System.

The Galileo project was launched in the summer of 2021 by Avi Loeb, a Harvard professor. One of the goals of Loeb's initiative is the search and study of objects similar to Oumuamua. Project Galileo is limited to the Solar System this is expected to help increase the accuracy of observations. A hundred scientists are already working on the Galileo Project, and within a few weeks of the initiative's launch, Loeb has raised $ 2 billion.

At the outset, it is worth explaining that this is not about Galileo, a European satellite navigation system that is an alternative to the American GPS or Russian GLONASS. The Galileo project has been in development since July 2021, and although the initiative quickly found generous sponsors (Loeb raised nearly $ 2 million, or PLN 8.87 million, from private investors within a few weeks), it is on the sidelines of the scientific world.

Life in Space Galileo searches for Alien technology a

For now, it's hard to say if that's right, as Loeb and the hundred astronomers and researchers around the world involved in the development of the Galileo Project have yet to discover any alien artifact, but the initiative itself is intriguing enough to make it worth a closer look.

Different assumptions, similar goal

Of course, the Galileo Project is not the first initiative to contact or discover an alien civilization - suffice it to mention SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence), a research project launched in the 1960s to intercept radio signals from space. In addition, scientists regularly send "packets of information" into space containing basic data about humanity and the position of the Earth in relation to other objects in our galaxy.

While further development of such initiatives is needed, Leob believes it is necessary to change priorities and begin the search for artifacts of alien civilizations that have ended up in the solar system, either intentionally or by accident. The researcher also adds (in a statement for Science Focus) that this change is already overdue, and in the last decades of increased space observation, humanity has missed many opportunities to discover the remains of UFO technology. As he adds:

Our research so far is based on the assumption that extraterrestrials communicate using radio waves, a technology that we have been using for a little over a century. Advanced extraterrestrials may long ago have abandoned her in favor of other methods of long and short range communication. I think a better strategy is to look for artifacts: alien technologies.

As you can guess, such statements are not very popular in the scientific community. As long as they sound effective and fit well with the media headlines (the vision of discovering UFO artifacts stimulates the imagination), there is simply no evidence to confirm them. In recent years, however, more and more scientists and researchers admit (one of them is Jason Wright, professor at the University of Pennsylvania) that the search for the so-called SETI artifacts have become much more popular.

For Leob himself, controversial from the scientific point of view statements are not unusual. In January 2021, his book "Extraterrestrial" was published, in which he argued that Oumuamua, the first object we detected outside the solar system, is not an asteroid or comet, but a remnant of alien technology. We recently looked at the "space cigar" theories in our journal, and among them we discussed the alien artifact. While Oumuamua has a very unusual shape and does not actually behave like a comet we have discovered before, there is insufficient evidence to conclusively conclude that it is a UFO artifact.

Life in Space Galileo searches for Alien technology b

Currently, Oumuamua is beyond our reach the object is leaving the Solar System (hence it is assigned the characteristics of a single-appearance comet), so we cannot study it. NASA has announced that it wants to catch up with Oumuamua, with the help of Project Lyra, but assuming that the vehicle is to take off from Earth in 2028, the ship will not arrive until around 2050-2054.

While the Oumuamua discovery itself is regarded as a major scientific success, Leob points out that astronomers were not prepared for its appearance, reflecting the low level of knowledge we have about the object. Therefore, one of the assumptions of the described initiative is the willingness to prepare