Friday, May 27, 2022
PSR J0523-7125

Scientists have detected the brightest pulsar ever observed outside of the Milky Way. At the same time, they confirmed what this strange bright object, previously mistaken for a distant galaxy. . Pulsars are extremely dense neutron stars that emit beams of electromagnetic radiation from their poles. They can be observed as bright, short pulses of light. Since their discovery in the 1960s by the Irish astrophysicist Jocelyn Bell, more than 2,000 pulsars have been detected, but the vast majority of them are inside our own galaxy.

The newly discovered pulsar: PSR J0523-7125 represents a much rarer discovery of an extragalactic pulsar far beyond the boundaries of the Milky Way, in this case the Large Magellanic Cloud.

PSR J0523 7125 a

PSR J0523−7125 was discovered by scientists using the Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) set of radio telescopes in Australia. "I was not expecting to find a new pulsar, let alone the brightest one," admitted astrophysicist Yuanming Wang of Australian CSIRO.

PSR J0523-7125 is about 10 times brighter than any other extragalactic pulsars previously seen, according to the researchers. This first discovery of this type was possible due to the use of a new method of observing the sky for pulsars. You can read about it in detail in The Astronomical Journal, where the study and its methodology are detailed.

According to the researchers, PSR J0523-7125 exceeds previous theoretical brightness limits for how bright pulsars in the Large Magellanic Cloud can be, showing that their brightness is as bright as objects seen in the Milky Way. Scientists hope that thanks to improved technology, the detection of similar objects will become even more common.

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PSR J0523-7125

Scientists have detected the brightest pulsar ever observed outside of the Milky Way. At the same time, they confirmed what this strange bright object, previously mistaken for a distant galaxy. . Pulsars are extremely dense neutron stars that emit beams of electromagnetic radiation from their poles. They can be observed as bright, short pulses of light. Since their discovery in the 1960s by the Irish astrophysicist Jocelyn Bell, more than 2,000 pulsars have been detected, but the vast majority of them are inside our own galaxy.

The newly discovered pulsar: PSR J0523-7125 represents a much rarer discovery of an extragalactic pulsar far beyond the boundaries of the Milky Way, in this case the Large Magellanic Cloud.

PSR J0523 7125 a

PSR J0523−7125 was discovered by scientists using the Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) set of radio telescopes in Australia. "I was not expecting to find a new pulsar, let alone the brightest one," admitted astrophysicist Yuanming Wang of Australian CSIRO.

PSR J0523-7125 is about 10 times brighter than any other extragalactic pulsars previously seen, according to the researchers. This first discovery of this type was possible due to the use of a new method of observing the sky for pulsars. You can read about it in detail in The Astronomical Journal, where the study and its methodology are detailed.

According to the researchers, PSR J0523-7125 exceeds previous theoretical brightness limits for how bright pulsars in the Large Magellanic Cloud can be, showing that their brightness is as bright as objects seen in the Milky Way. Scientists hope that thanks to improved technology, the detection of similar objects will become even more common.