Friday, May 27, 2022
Artificial intelligence to recognize animal emotions
Artificial intelligence to recognize animal emotions

An international team of scientists has translated pig's grunts into emotions they seem to express. Thousands of recordings collected throughout the lives of pigs, from birth to death, helped. The researchers also used artificial intelligence to deduce how the pigs felt from their gasps.

What are pigs croaking about?

Scientists have developed a special algorithm that decodes pigs' grunts and squeals into what scientists believe are the emotions they express under many different conditions and stages of life. The authors of the study described how, using 7,414 videos obtained from 411 pigs, they trained an AI system to determine which grunts, squeaks and groans expressed happy feelings and which expressed negative emotions. Researchers suggest that such a system can automatically monitor the welfare of livestock.

Studies by scientists from the University of Copenhagen, the Federal University of Technology in Zurich and the French National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment (INRAE) have been published in Scientific Reports (DOI: 10.1038 / s41598-022-07174-8).

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Artificial intelligence to recognize animal emotions
Artificial intelligence to recognize animal emotions

An international team of scientists has translated pig's grunts into emotions they seem to express. Thousands of recordings collected throughout the lives of pigs, from birth to death, helped. The researchers also used artificial intelligence to deduce how the pigs felt from their gasps.

What are pigs croaking about?

Scientists have developed a special algorithm that decodes pigs' grunts and squeals into what scientists believe are the emotions they express under many different conditions and stages of life. The authors of the study described how, using 7,414 videos obtained from 411 pigs, they trained an AI system to determine which grunts, squeaks and groans expressed happy feelings and which expressed negative emotions. Researchers suggest that such a system can automatically monitor the welfare of livestock.

Studies by scientists from the University of Copenhagen, the Federal University of Technology in Zurich and the French National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment (INRAE) have been published in Scientific Reports (DOI: 10.1038 / s41598-022-07174-8).