Friday, May 27, 2022
Finally a solution for cleaning solar modules.

MIT researchers have presented another amazing innovation. They have developed a method to prevent dust from accumulating on solar panels. The most important thing is that the cleaning does not require the precious water. 

The share of solar energy is growing. At the same time, many engineers are busy researching storage options. The experts from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) estimate that the share of solar energy will be 10% by 2030. The goal is clear: capture solar energy in regions where the modules do not interfere and where a particularly large amount of UV light reaches the earth in the desert. To do this, however, an obvious problem must first be solved: how can the solar modules be kept clean? Dust pollution can reduce the performance of photovoltaic systems by up to 30% in just one month. A research team from MIT has developed an ingenious concept for this. 

Sometimes 0.1% here and sometimes 0.2% there. Huge efforts are required to further improve the efficiency of solar modules. Larger leaps are rarely successful. According to Kripa Varanasi, Professor of Mechanical Engineering at MIT, it is all the more astonishing that none of his colleagues has yet solved the cleaning problem. "A problem as trivial as dust can throw a spanner in the works."

Because together with his team, he calculated the performance losses in detail and transferred them to financial losses. According to this, a drop in output of just a single percentage point in a 150-megawatt solar system would lead to annual revenue losses of 200,000 dollars (around 182,000 euros).

 

Recommended for Engineer Workplace

Best Gifts for Engineer

Finally a solution for cleaning solar modules.

MIT researchers have presented another amazing innovation. They have developed a method to prevent dust from accumulating on solar panels. The most important thing is that the cleaning does not require the precious water. 

The share of solar energy is growing. At the same time, many engineers are busy researching storage options. The experts from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) estimate that the share of solar energy will be 10% by 2030. The goal is clear: capture solar energy in regions where the modules do not interfere and where a particularly large amount of UV light reaches the earth in the desert. To do this, however, an obvious problem must first be solved: how can the solar modules be kept clean? Dust pollution can reduce the performance of photovoltaic systems by up to 30% in just one month. A research team from MIT has developed an ingenious concept for this. 

Sometimes 0.1% here and sometimes 0.2% there. Huge efforts are required to further improve the efficiency of solar modules. Larger leaps are rarely successful. According to Kripa Varanasi, Professor of Mechanical Engineering at MIT, it is all the more astonishing that none of his colleagues has yet solved the cleaning problem. "A problem as trivial as dust can throw a spanner in the works."

Because together with his team, he calculated the performance losses in detail and transferred them to financial losses. According to this, a drop in output of just a single percentage point in a 150-megawatt solar system would lead to annual revenue losses of 200,000 dollars (around 182,000 euros).