Friday, May 27, 2022
champigons

The analysis shows that there is a statistical relationship between eating mushrooms and a lower risk of depression. It's unclear, however, whether this is due to the mushrooms themselves. The latest analysis of statistical data indicates that edible mushrooms may protect against depression. Scientists looked at the mental health data of 24,000 people in the United States that had been collected over 10 years ago. They show that people who eat mushrooms are less likely to be depressed.

This is an unexpected discovery. It was previously known that some species of hallucinogenic mushrooms had such properties. The psilocybin present in them in small doses has an antidepressant effect. However, edible mushrooms have never been suspected of having such properties. The mystery is deepened by the fact that more mushrooms are not associated with a lower risk of depression. Those who eat mushrooms are simply less likely to be depressed. Regardless of whether they eat them rarely or often and in large amounts. We eat mushrooms most often. They do not have much nutritional value, although they do contain a lot of potassium

In the United States, the most consumed mushrooms are, as in Poland, champignons. They do not have any unique properties known to science. However, they contain a lot of potassium, which researchers say may reduce anxiety levels. Another fungus popular in the United States is the lion's mane. In Poland, it grows on old trees and dead wood. It is strictly protected, but in many countries it is cultivated and appreciated for its taste, which is said to resemble lobsters. Several previous studies have indicated its antidepressant effects.

"Our study is further evidence that edible mushrooms have health benefits," says Joshua Muscat of Pennsylvania State University.

The antidepressant effect of edible mushrooms requires further research

Scientists point out that the association of eating mushrooms with a lower risk of depression may be completely coincidental, it is the so-called correlation. It consists in the fact that two phenomena are not directly related to each other, but have a common cause. People who eat mushrooms more often, for example, may also eat vegetables and fruit more often. Many studies show that a healthy and varied diet also reduces the risk of depression.

What specifically could make mushrooms prevent depression? This is still unknown. Several compounds that stimulate the growth of neurons and the production of substances with an anti-inflammatory effect have been found in the mycosis. Some researchers consider chronic inflammation to be the cause of depression.

Many cap mushrooms also contain ergothioneine. It is a natural amino acid that has an anti-inflammatory effect and can penetrate the brain. Mushrooms are a rich source of this amino acid. The human body does not produce it, says Djibril Ba, also from Penn State University. Does this have to do with a lower risk of depression? More research is needed to unravel this mystery.

Source: Journal of Affective Disorders.

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champigons

The analysis shows that there is a statistical relationship between eating mushrooms and a lower risk of depression. It's unclear, however, whether this is due to the mushrooms themselves. The latest analysis of statistical data indicates that edible mushrooms may protect against depression. Scientists looked at the mental health data of 24,000 people in the United States that had been collected over 10 years ago. They show that people who eat mushrooms are less likely to be depressed.

This is an unexpected discovery. It was previously known that some species of hallucinogenic mushrooms had such properties. The psilocybin present in them in small doses has an antidepressant effect. However, edible mushrooms have never been suspected of having such properties. The mystery is deepened by the fact that more mushrooms are not associated with a lower risk of depression. Those who eat mushrooms are simply less likely to be depressed. Regardless of whether they eat them rarely or often and in large amounts. We eat mushrooms most often. They do not have much nutritional value, although they do contain a lot of potassium

In the United States, the most consumed mushrooms are, as in Poland, champignons. They do not have any unique properties known to science. However, they contain a lot of potassium, which researchers say may reduce anxiety levels. Another fungus popular in the United States is the lion's mane. In Poland, it grows on old trees and dead wood. It is strictly protected, but in many countries it is cultivated and appreciated for its taste, which is said to resemble lobsters. Several previous studies have indicated its antidepressant effects.

"Our study is further evidence that edible mushrooms have health benefits," says Joshua Muscat of Pennsylvania State University.

The antidepressant effect of edible mushrooms requires further research

Scientists point out that the association of eating mushrooms with a lower risk of depression may be completely coincidental, it is the so-called correlation. It consists in the fact that two phenomena are not directly related to each other, but have a common cause. People who eat mushrooms more often, for example, may also eat vegetables and fruit more often. Many studies show that a healthy and varied diet also reduces the risk of depression.

What specifically could make mushrooms prevent depression? This is still unknown. Several compounds that stimulate the growth of neurons and the production of substances with an anti-inflammatory effect have been found in the mycosis. Some researchers consider chronic inflammation to be the cause of depression.

Many cap mushrooms also contain ergothioneine. It is a natural amino acid that has an anti-inflammatory effect and can penetrate the brain. Mushrooms are a rich source of this amino acid. The human body does not produce it, says Djibril Ba, also from Penn State University. Does this have to do with a lower risk of depression? More research is needed to unravel this mystery.

Source: Journal of Affective Disorders.