Friday, May 27, 2022
Photo: pinoytourism.com
Photo: pinoytourism.com

A joint project helps Israel and Jordan. The latter will possibly be able to contribute to the energy supply of the neighbors, because hardly anywhere else is the solar radiation so high. Perhaps Europe will also benefit from this.

Jordan is one of the most arid countries in the world. Just 150 m3 are available per person per year. Most of this goes to agriculture, which continues to expand to feed the country's growing population, including many refugees.

Jordan is also one of the world's sunniest countries. With 330 days of sunshine per year and an output of 5 to 7 kW/m2, the country is ideally suited to generate inexpensive solar power. In the field of renewable energies, Jordan is considered one of the world's most promising markets.

Electricity from Jordan for drinking water production

Israel, on the other hand, operates solar power plants, but the available space is limited. In addition, the country already has five seawater desalination plants and is planning two more. They need a lot of electricity, which the political leadership wants to generate as environmentally friendly as possible. This is where the interests of the two neighboring countries meet. Israel, which already supplies drinking water to Jordan, intends to increase the annual volume from the current 50 million m3 to 200 million m3/a in the future. The electricity required for this will be supplied by a 600 MW solar power plant that the United Arab Emirates are building in Jordan.

The energy for this will come from Jordan in the future.

"It's a win-win situation and a model for thinking outside the box on climate security," says Gidon Bromberg, co-founder and Israeli director of EcoPeace Middle East, an Israeli-Jordanian-Palestinian environmental organization independent of the states. "The deal creates a new model for healthy interdependencies between countries in our region," says Yana Abu Taleb, Jordanian director of EcoPeace MiddleEast. "Jordan could become a regional center for renewable energy and sell it to the entire region, not just Israel," enthuses Taleb.

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Photo: pinoytourism.com
Photo: pinoytourism.com

A joint project helps Israel and Jordan. The latter will possibly be able to contribute to the energy supply of the neighbors, because hardly anywhere else is the solar radiation so high. Perhaps Europe will also benefit from this.

Jordan is one of the most arid countries in the world. Just 150 m3 are available per person per year. Most of this goes to agriculture, which continues to expand to feed the country's growing population, including many refugees.

Jordan is also one of the world's sunniest countries. With 330 days of sunshine per year and an output of 5 to 7 kW/m2, the country is ideally suited to generate inexpensive solar power. In the field of renewable energies, Jordan is considered one of the world's most promising markets.

Electricity from Jordan for drinking water production

Israel, on the other hand, operates solar power plants, but the available space is limited. In addition, the country already has five seawater desalination plants and is planning two more. They need a lot of electricity, which the political leadership wants to generate as environmentally friendly as possible. This is where the interests of the two neighboring countries meet. Israel, which already supplies drinking water to Jordan, intends to increase the annual volume from the current 50 million m3 to 200 million m3/a in the future. The electricity required for this will be supplied by a 600 MW solar power plant that the United Arab Emirates are building in Jordan.

The energy for this will come from Jordan in the future.

"It's a win-win situation and a model for thinking outside the box on climate security," says Gidon Bromberg, co-founder and Israeli director of EcoPeace Middle East, an Israeli-Jordanian-Palestinian environmental organization independent of the states. "The deal creates a new model for healthy interdependencies between countries in our region," says Yana Abu Taleb, Jordanian director of EcoPeace MiddleEast. "Jordan could become a regional center for renewable energy and sell it to the entire region, not just Israel," enthuses Taleb.