Friday, May 27, 2022
Photo: NewsWire

When it comes to researchers from ETH Zurich and engineers from Verity, drones will soon be added to the team in large warehouses. They should reduce errors, ensure efficiency and even more sustainability across the entire supply chain.

Forklifts connect everyone to a warehouse. One rarely thinks of a drone. Researchers at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETH) are working intensively on the use of so-called quadrocopters in camps. Equipped with cameras, lots of software and lights, they fly down every single aisle and the shelves, scan barcodes independently, check digital inventory lists and are therefore the automated "night shift". Your human colleagues enjoy the end of the day during this time.

Raffaello D'Andrea, professor at the Institute for Dynamic Systems and Control Engineering, even founded a company with some of his former students: the so-called spin-off "Verity". The company has been developing automation solutions for warehouses since 2014. "Although Verity's technology has evolved beyond the confines of the laboratory, a large part of it stems from our basic research," says co-founder Markus Hehn. In his doctoral thesis, he worked on adaptive algorithms, thanks to which quadrocopters can fly slalom and even play catch with a pendulum.

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Photo: NewsWire

When it comes to researchers from ETH Zurich and engineers from Verity, drones will soon be added to the team in large warehouses. They should reduce errors, ensure efficiency and even more sustainability across the entire supply chain.

Forklifts connect everyone to a warehouse. One rarely thinks of a drone. Researchers at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETH) are working intensively on the use of so-called quadrocopters in camps. Equipped with cameras, lots of software and lights, they fly down every single aisle and the shelves, scan barcodes independently, check digital inventory lists and are therefore the automated "night shift". Your human colleagues enjoy the end of the day during this time.

Raffaello D'Andrea, professor at the Institute for Dynamic Systems and Control Engineering, even founded a company with some of his former students: the so-called spin-off "Verity". The company has been developing automation solutions for warehouses since 2014. "Although Verity's technology has evolved beyond the confines of the laboratory, a large part of it stems from our basic research," says co-founder Markus Hehn. In his doctoral thesis, he worked on adaptive algorithms, thanks to which quadrocopters can fly slalom and even play catch with a pendulum.