October 20, 2020

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Arctic tundra in summer

Arctic tundra in summer
New research techniques are being adopted by scientists tackling the most visible impact of climate change: the so-called" greening of Arctic regions".

New research techniques are being adopted by scientists tackling the most visible impact of climate change: the so-called” greening of Arctic regions”.

The latest drone and satellite technology is helping an international team of researchers better understand how the vast, treeless regions called the tundra is becoming greener.

New research techniques are being adopted by scientists tackling the most visible impact of climate change — the so-called greening of Arctic regions.

Understanding how data captured from the air compare with observations made on the ground will help to build the clearest picture yet of how the northern regions of Europe, Asia and North America are changing as the temperature rises.

Now a team of 40 scientists from 36 institutions, led by two National Geographic Explorers, have revealed that the causes of this greening process are more complex — and variable — than was previously thought.
Researchers from Europe and North America are finding that the Arctic greening observed from space is caused by more than just the responses of tundra plants to warming on the ground. Satellites are also capturing other changes including differences in the timing of snowmelt and the wetness of landscapes.